karl_lembke (karl_lembke) wrote,
karl_lembke
karl_lembke

Never write in a message...

...anything you wouldn't want appearing on the front page of the paper.

This essay, which originally appeared in Forbes Magazine, warns us of "The Death of Ephemeral Conversation".
The political firestorm over former U.S. Rep. Mark Foley’s salacious instant messages hides another issue, one about privacy. We are rapidly turning into a society where our intimate conversations can be saved and made public later. This represents an enormous loss of freedom and liberty, and the only way to solve the problem is through legislation.


Everyday conversation used to be ephemeral. Whether face-to-face or by phone, we could be reasonably sure that what we said disappeared as soon as we said it. Of course, organized crime bosses worried about phone taps and room bugs, but that was the exception. Privacy was the default assumption.

This has changed. We now type our casual conversations. We chat in e-mail, with instant messages on our computer and SMS messages on our cellphones, and in comments on social networking Web sites like Friendster, LiveJournal, and MySpace. These conversations – with friends, lovers, colleagues, fellow employees – are not ephemeral; they leave their own electronic trails.

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